THE COUNCIL

HAVING REGARD to Article 5(b) of the Convention on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development of 14th December 1960;

HAVING REGARD to the Resolution of the O.E.E.C. Council of 28th July 1960 concerning the Fishery Policies of Member Countries, approved by the Council on 30th September 1961 [Doc. Nos. C(60) 178, OECD/C(61)5];

HAVING REGARD to the Report by the Fisheries Committee of 12th February 1964 on Subsidies and Other Financial Support to the Fishing Industries of Member Countries [Doc. No. C(64)29];

I.            RECOMMENDS to the Governments of Member Countries, when they determine their fishery policies, to take into consideration the above mentioned Report on Subsidies and Other Financial Support to the Fishing Industries of Member Countries, and, in particular, the conclusions listed in the report in paragraph 4 of the introduction, in paragraphs 39 to 45 of the general part and in the following recommendations.

II.           INSTRUCTS the Fisheries Committee to follow the implementation of the present Recommendation and to examine periodically the development of the situation as regards subsidies and other financial support to fisheries in Member Countries.

In adopting this Recommendation, the Council:

1.            AGREED to the publication of the Report by the Fisheries Committee of 12th February 1964 referred to above.

2.            NOTED the statements by the Delegates for Iceland and Norway who were against tying the trade aspects of fisheries to the question of access to fishing grounds, the Delegate for the United Kingdom who felt that the problem of access to markets could not be solved in isolation of the problem of access to fishing grounds, and the Delegate for Japan who pointed out that eventual compliance with Part I of this Recommendation depended on the long-term efforts being exerted by his Government to improve and modernise the structure of Japanese coastal fisheries, characterized by a predominance of small managements and a level of income comparatively low by both international and internal standards.